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Now I realise these aren't sold in Australia (at least I don't think they are), but this makes for fascinating reading if you are at all interested in what goes into your mouth to nourish your body.

From FOOD MATTERS:

What's Really In A Twinkie?

Ever wondered what’s actually in a Twinkie? It’s a wonder it’s sold as food at all! Find out why it’s the poster child for Frankenfoods below and the key reasons why we’d never touch a Twinkie!

  • A single Twinkie contains 37 ingredients, but only 5 of them are ‘recognizable’. Flour. Egg. Water. Sugar. Salt. 
  • Twinkies’ ingredients are manufactured with fourteen of the top twenty chemicals made in the U.S.
  • Wholefood ingredients have been replaced by chemical concoctions. For example, less egg has been used, as they’ve been replaced by monoglycerides and diglycerides - chemicals to bind fats and water-based ingredients, and extend the shelf life of the product.
  • It contains harmful ingredients that contribute significant risk to chronic disease including high fructose corn syrup (and 4 other types of sugar!) Yep there’s 5 types of nasty sugar in a Twinkie! 
  • The unhealthiest kind of fats are lurking in there - hydrogenated vegetable fats (trans fats) which are simply awful for your health! 
  • The vitamins, artificial colors, and flavorings come from petroleum.
  • The cream center contains absolutely no cream! Instead, it’s full of shortening - a cheap fat. 
  • It also contains a small amount of sodium stearate - one of the most common ingredients found in soap! No thank you!
  • So many of the ingredients come from overseas including China, where there are hardly any regulations placed on their use. Scary!


Just take a look at the ingredients list:


That box of creamy sponge cake might look innocent, but they're anything but!

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G.A. Read the labels if you have the time and lots do not. If the label is a long one with complex names in a small point size, put it back on the shelf.

Yep. If the ingredients are numbers then it's not food and you don't eat it. Trying to get my kids to start reading labels.

This is why, despite being extremely busy, I try to make our own biscuits, muffins and cakes for school lunches from real butter, our own eggs and added fruits and nuts so I can at least pretend they are a little healthier :) Not that my kids don't eat store bought crap, but the more I can make myself - the better. My current system is to make up a big batch of biscuits or muffins and then freeze most of them (otherwise they wouldn't last more than 2 days in our house). Unfortunately, my husband loves store bought crap so it's a balance in this house.

I used to make all my own baking for the kids for years, including bread for a while. They still gravitated to the store bought stuff which was pretty disheartening. Two of them had/have problems with obesity. All in their 30's now and long ago stopped listening to Mum.

The two with the weight problems I took Debendox during their pregnancies. The one without any problems, I didn't. Did it have an effect on their hormonal system or something else? Who knows.

Nonetheless, many of the gluten free bakes are similar concoctions. No where as bad as a twinkie,  but they call on a lot of ingredients.

Since I eat pastries hardly at all and seldom indulge in bread, this is easy for me to say because I don't have a sweet tooth.

But the seed grains do present us with a few challenges primarily because they spent so many eons protecting themselves from being eaten. Later engineering,  since the 19th century, especially with wheat, has only worsened the trend as has been the relentless increase in gluten content of the wheat grain.

If sugar is addictive --as it most assuredly is -- then so too is wheat.

While the jury is still out as the research isn't conclusive -- if I was bringing up kids today (been there/done that) I'd consider cutting back on the wheat products and offering some wheat fasts. And doing that without resorting to 'gluten free' substitutes.

That's not a minor shift of course: biscuits, bread, pasta, pizza...wheat is in so much of what we eat. Along with sugar, I'm thinking that wheat is a taboo worth exploring.

Wheat consumption is falling both here and in other countries. That may be food fadism but then there is history that bears down upon our bellies. Sugar consumption also seems to be tied to wheat consumption:

Historical data indicate that there have been previous periods of growth and decline in wheat consumption. From a low starting point in the 1600s, consumption of wheat flour rose to about 225 pounds per capita in 1880, and then fell to about 110 pounds a century later. These shifts reflected supply-side factors-including changes in wheat production, milling, and transportation-in addition to demand for more diversified diets.Wheat production was difficult in New England and in much of the South in the colonial era (1600s and 1700s), making wheat flour too expensive for regular use. High transportation costs also made long-distance transport of wheat and flour from regions better suited for wheat growing unprofitable. Therefore, colonists in these regions turned to other crops, especially corn. The wealthy were the principal consumers of wheat bread....From 1890 until 1920, the greatest increase in food consumption occurred with sugar, and the greatest decrease was in cornmeal. Rising prosperity led to a pronounced shift from cornmeal to wheat flour, especially in the South, and an equally important substitution of sugar for wheat flour. Sugar prices had been dropping sharply since the 1850s with the development of improved refining technology...

The decline in wheat consumption slowed during the 1960s, partly because consumers became increasingly aware of possible links between a diet high in animal products and cholesterol. Wheat products were viewed by many consumers at the time as a healthy, alternative food choice.

The rapid expansion of the fast-food industry also boosted per capita consumption of wheat products. These businesses, providing items such as sandwiches, hamburgers, breaded chicken, pizza, and bagels, spread rapidly in the 1970s and 1980s....

Between 1972 and 1997, U.S. wheat producers and millers could count on rising per capita food use of wheat flour to expand their domestic market. The decades-long growth ended in 1997 as changing consumer preferences, led by the adoption of low-carbohydrate diets, reduced per capita wheat consumption. Consumer interest in these diets spiked after 2000. Per capita flour use dropped rapidly at first and then fell more slowly until reaching a low of 132.5 in 2011. (SOURCE)

Each to their own but I'm on this particular sync:the two worst foods on offer in everyday consumption  are sugar and wheat. (SOURCE : Authority Nutrition) 

I guess that means no twinkies!

The Sugar Free, Wheat Free Diet

In my opinion, the two worst foods in the diet are sugar and wheat.

I’m pretty sure that 80% of the health benefits of low-carb and paleo diets stem from the fact that they eliminate these two from the diet (along with trans fats and vegetable oils).

The SFWF diet is pretty much like paleo + full-fat dairy + healthier carb sources.

The focus is on quality food… choosing good sources of fat, good sources of protein and good sources of carbohydrates.

  • Rule #1 – Avoid added sugars.
  • Rule #2 – Avoid wheat.
  • Rule #3 – Also avoid trans fats and vegetable oils.
  • Rule #4 – Don’t drink calories (no sodas, fruit juices).
  • Rule #5 – Eat real, unprocessed foods.

What Foods to Eat

It is important to choose real, unprocessed foods that resemble something you might find in nature.

Just like before, you can eat meat, fish, eggs, fruits, full-fat dairy products, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

But now you can add healthy carbs into the mix:

  • Tubers: Potatoes, sweet potatoes, taro, etc.
  • Non-gluten grains: Rice, oats, quinoa, etc.
  • Fruits: Bananas, apples, oranges, pears, berries, etc.
  • Vegetables: Broccoli, cauliflower, carrots, etc.

I’d like to stress the fact that potatoes really are an excellent food.

I'm an avid label reader, my motto is if I don't understand what an ingieident is then I leave it on the shelf.

I've just been reading the books by David Gillespie, 'Toxic Oil' re seed oils & 'Sweet Poison' re sugar consumption, very enlightening.

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