Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

I'm  a person who braises and stews  (food that is). By habit, I've gravitated to an interest in squashes.

Not one to tolerate the angst of growing standard zucchinis in SEQld -- I defer to other varieties.

This time of year the Tromboncino option isn't hugely productive, but with foresight I've planted many more Tatume (aka Calabacita) than I need.

Tatume is a Mexican staple. Grows without problem in this humid weather, fruits profusely and tastes fabulous. 

No major diseases.

There is a longer variety but the round is so nicely contained.

As vines, they do take off, but i find therm better behaved than other climbing squashes as I can grow them along rope lines if I want. Picked young, about the size of a cricket ball, they won't weigh your trellising down as their growth  habit is much like choko.

They do taste a lot better than chokos. As the local pumpkin hub points out:

"Inside, the thick yellow flesh is firm, moist and not stringy with a nice mild taste and medium sweet finish.  Flesh is plentiful." -- Pumpkin Paradise, Bundaberg

If you are of the zucchini persuasion -- I'd definitely  choose Tatume as the accompanying crop to Tomboncino.

Very versatile in the kitchen too as these recipes suggest.

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Sorry Barb and Chris.  I got three lots of seeds.  The Tatume from Pumpkin Paradise and a Golden Nugget pumpkin and Burgundy Snake Beans from Happy Valley Seeds.  They all turned up so quickly on the same day.  Wahoo!  Total cost was less than $12. 

Great! Happy planting.

My Tatume are fruiting now. I get rather greedy with them as I can't wait for these squashes to get to eating size. Since I have so many climbing squash varieties -- gourds and pumpkins and whatever -- in my garden throughout the year, it is hard deciding which is which.

But the Tatume is tasty and versatile in the kitchen. So I wait and watch the flowers form in hope of a menu item. I much prefer it to ALL the zucchinis -- including Trombonchino.

I have Tatume coming on and Seminole Pumpkins as well as a couple of fruits from what I assume is Cucurbita ficifolia

Squash variety complexities drive me crazy!

But C.ficifolia looks like this:

With pale flesh.

In Mexico, among its other names, it is called Chilacayote. Last time I grew it I kept getting it mixed up with Calabacita and cooked it accordingly. Well it's very different and has a sweeter taste and nutritious seeds +++.

I'm not sure how I'll prepare it after harvest.

Back in 2017 I cooked it this way: mistaking it for Calabacita

I went in way too early.  I planted when I got the seed months ago.  Is it too late to plant now?

I don't know. Just try some of them. And see. So long as there isn't frostiness it should be kosher. It also masquerades with an American accent as a 'Winter Squash'.

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