Replies

  • A couple of hours in the kayak today produced this result.

    34634000?profile=original

    This is enough fish to feed us for a fortnight (we don't consume a lot of fish). A few of those snubnoses were pushing 30cm, big by Brisbane standard.

    I saw the other day at the Gold Coast local garfish filets selling for $49.00/kg! Sure, I knew prices of locally caught seafood were fast outpacing CPI year on year but that's a bit steep.

    We probably wouldn't eat fish (at least whole ones) if I didn't go fishing. Leaving the guts in until point of sale doesn't quite improve the table quality of the product. :(

  • Also check out Australian Marine Conservation Society's sustainable seafood guide which is available as a book, online and also available as a handy iphone app - if you have one!

    http://www.amcs.org.au/WhatWeDo.asp?active_page_id=167

    • ooh yes indeed, great online guide. wish my phone was a mac. not that i go fishing all that often, but it would be great to have access to the info all the time

      • I don't go fishing, but I eat fish sometimes, and try to only eat sustainable types!

        • yes, me too - which means i don't eat nearly as much fish as i'd like to...

          in fact i even take fish oil capsules to make up for it at times (Blackmores has a sustainably harvested fish oil capsule apparently..)
          and the cat who adopted us has never tasted fish! I gave him the cheeks out of a fish i caught and he was very suspicious of it and didn't eat it - haha 

          • Apparently fish are not a natural part of a cat's diet so it's crazy we feed it to them - no doubt a lot of it is 'flake' which is definitely not sustainable!

  • A few years ago not many products had certification. Am amazed by the number of mass distributed products now listed on their website. I went to a fund raising dinner and explanation of this organisation several years ago (hosted by Prince Phillip, the Queens' Consort, and Kerry O'Brien from the 7.30 report no less! not that i got to do anything except see them up on the stage ;) and it is totally the real deal. 

    Basically, accreditation means not catching more than are breeding, healthy, environmentally responsible, and in the case of farmed fish, not depleting vulnerable species to feed as fish meal to farmed species.

    This is the mark to look for:

    34633940?profile=original

    Apaprently, for fresh fish (not mass distributed), the species to go for are whiting, flathead and mullet. Everything else is pretty much endangered (or very endangered - actually at risk of extinction SOON), unfortunately :(

    Pity. I love fish.

    But guess what? there is a tuna variety listed on the website! Unbelievable. I'd love to be able to eat tuna! At least occasionally. Meanwhile, I keep trying to catch whiting at the beach (hard when all the local pippis have been over-harvested...)

    • I think certain fish stocks can and will rebound quickly if given the chance. We used to fish a lot off a beach at Batemans Bay in NSW. Within 2 years of the entire area being made off limits to commercial fishermen, we noticed we were catching more bream than ever before. Other anglers we spoke to have said the same thing. To trawl the rivers and creeks for bait prawn is just plain stupid, that's killing the nurseries.

      I'm not sure there's much to catch down in Vic ;) I think the further north one goes, the easier the fishing is. Here in Brisbane I was amazed I could get good sized fish in the middle of a sunny day.

      Have you tried catching yelloweye mullet? They should be quite common there. And for a mullet, they are pretty good on a plate. By the way, this beach we frequented had amazing numbers of pipi, but still very few whiting and even fewer caught on pipi. Sand whiting in southern NSW seem to prefer live yabbie over everything else inc beach worms.

      • I'm down on the Southern coast, and there's heaps of fish here - far enough away from the cities, I think. I caught a beautiful bumpy nose bream standing in the surf recently.

        Problem with mullet is I don't like their taste much :(  Bit muddy and red for me. There are probably good ways to prepare it, but I'm ignorant I'm afraid.

        I do hope the fish stocks will rebound - it makes sense, we just have to stop catching all the little ones and over-fishing and polluting. (*sigh*)

        I've caught amazing King George whiting on pippis - I do like surf fishing. I caught a very pretty red rock ling from the end of a breakwater recently - thai fish cakes! delicious :) but I miss my kaffir lime tree

        there are salmon in the water down here, but i'm yet to catch one - i caught a jolly good cold trying recently, despite the wetsuit ;)

        • You may be thinking of sea mullet? They're oily and usually strongly flavoured - muddy and/or weedy too if caught in estuaries. I don't like them either except as bait in crab pots. The yelloweye is a species that feeds on much the same food as sand whiting, I've only ever caught them from surf beaches. 

          KG whiting would be superb. I don't know what you think of silver trevally but we used to prefer catching them over snapper.

          I do miss surf fishing. There's plenty of fish in Moreton Bay but it's not quite the same as clean waves and sand between the toes. 

          Australian salmon make great Thai fish cakes. Besides, you'd need all the spices to mask the flavour. :)

This reply was deleted.