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Australian native bees A gentle way to split the hive

Eduction is a gentle way to split and Australian native bee hive.

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Comment by Christa on February 14, 2019 at 8:23

Like Elaine, seeing a green frog in my garden would make me very happy.  The cane toad is known to eat bees on the hive and we have had a preying mantis sit on our hive and having a feast.  We just relocated him or her.   Pesticides do the greatest damage.

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on February 14, 2019 at 7:33

Dianne, the green tree frogs are not known as bee-eaters afaik. But they are insect-centric so perhaps the hive-top is a good place to grab insects flying past. I'd be thrilled to see a big green wherever it decided to sit ;-)

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on February 13, 2019 at 19:26

I wouldn't worry about one frog Dianne. Gayle - eduction is tricky.  It is supposed to take at least four months before they recognise a second hive has been created.  Once that appeared to have happened, I separated them quickly even though only two months had passed.  I hoping the lightness of the hives just reflects the fact that so many died when they went to war.  Rotating the hives should help even out the numbers.  I have also noticed that both hives are now using the north entries (where the joiner pipe used to be).  Originally, both were using south entries.  Russell - the natives are fascinating little buggers. 

Comment by Dianne Caswell on February 13, 2019 at 19:00

Very interesting, I have just gone outside to check on the newly split hives and what is sitting on top, a beautiful Big Green Tree Frog.. Don't know if this is good or bad.. has, he/she found a good place to sit for free food???

Comment by GayleD on February 13, 2019 at 8:33

Been reading up in Christa's bee book. Not very positive about the chances of budding/eduction between hives surviving.  Suggests that you have to be ready to seperate before the old colony realises that the new colony has a queen. While the idea is attractive, I'm going to have to learn a lot more about bee behaviour before trying anything like that.

Comment by Russell James on February 13, 2019 at 8:22

I have put together a European beehive and joined the local beekeeping association quite a fascinating learning curve as I come to realize the intricacies of beekeeping.  

There has just aired a program on the ABC about bees and it had a segment on native bees.

Comment by GayleD on February 12, 2019 at 21:34

I was wondering why the pipe at the back as well.  I get the idea of a pipe to make the bees go through the new empty box and hopefully set up home but if the top back exit hole was available, wouldn't that make it easy for them to adapt to being two hives and not one?

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on February 12, 2019 at 19:49

Numbers are down in the new hive.  I've rotated them now.  Both hives feel quite light.  I'm worried I should have removed the pipe earlier - but jeez, I went early as it was. 

Comment by Christa on February 12, 2019 at 18:24

Gee Whiz, Andy, the accommodation is a bit rough , but I suppose the bees don't notice.  Have you had any more losses since you took the eduction tube off?

We are hoping one of our colonies that are a bit low in numbers, will pick up a bit. As soon as it cools down a bit, I will plant some flowering herbs etc. 

They have been known to gather resin from mango trees so we should be OK. 

Comment by GayleD on February 12, 2019 at 14:54
looks like a good way to do it

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