Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

I have several Grow Bags that are in a Semi Shaded position. Unfortunately I can't move them. as they are full of compost.

I am wanting to plant Semi Shade loving vegetables or fruits - any suggestions. They can be permanent planting as a couple of the bags are quite big.

PS - We have decided we are going to have the Quandong cut down this year, we will be on baked beans for a while to save up for the Tree Lopper.

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Comment by Christa on February 13, 2016 at 10:03

Good info, Jeff,  I have a bag of Zeolite and it is heavy stuff, like lead.  It is a good addition to soil,  and I wish I could remember where I bought it from.  I notice the popular brands of potting mix- have zeolite in them now.

Comment by Jeff Kiehne on February 13, 2016 at 9:28
Comment by Dianne Caswell on February 13, 2016 at 9:22

I have planted some Lamb's Lettuce, Mibuna and a Red Paw Paw (seeding from Dave's GV) in a couple of the Grow Bags in the Semi Shaded position. Also Kang Kong in an old Bread Crock that a Buderim Potter made for me about 40 years ago (I am sure she would turn in her grave, if she knew), and Vietnamese Mint in a Shaded Spot of my Kitchen Herb Garden. So as you can see I am getting there with the Semi Shaded plantings. But if you think of any more please post them as I am sure other member have these funny little spots in there garden as well.

Comment by Dianne Caswell on February 13, 2016 at 9:11

Thanks everyone for your thoughts. I am aware and know how to use the Chemicals but would this time would prefer another alternative. I will use the Chemicals if I have to.

Don't know if I told you but I am putting these into the ground not post, though 2 are going in pots and I will use Azalea & Camellia potting mix, with a couple of other add ons.  

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on February 13, 2016 at 8:50

A good point Jeff. I do notice that the one plant needs repeated applications so whatever-it-is is still missing even tho the Iron fixes most of the problems.

Comment by Jeff Kiehne on February 13, 2016 at 8:13

If  it needs Iron Chelate then it may also need other micro nuitrient  and by using Iron Chelate could have effect using complete micro nuitrient may be better option with the iron Chelate.

Comment by Christa on February 12, 2016 at 20:45

Can't find the page that I read about Iron Chelate, but this site has some info about sulphur and iron.

As my soil is sandy based and it leaches minerals with watering and excess rain, I decided to buy some and water the plants that are showing signs of yellowing as you say.

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on February 12, 2016 at 20:06

Not really up with what happens with Iron Chelate but I do use it on one particular Blueberry plant which shows signs of iron deficiency. That's yellowing of young leaves with bright green veins. Just mix as per directions and water it in. Not a permanent cure but enables the plant to live a good productive life.

Comment by Christa on February 12, 2016 at 18:13

Dianne, I read somewhere that some Iron Chelates can be used to increase acidity in the soil, if you do not wish to add sulphur powder.  Elaine mentions a light dusting, those are key words.

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on February 12, 2016 at 17:45

Indeed it does Roger! I use that Searles mix too and because I add other stuff like soaked coir I also add a dusting of Sulphur powder. The plants seem OK with it.

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