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My Palagonite experiment

 

You may remember that I planted out two identical "Rouge De Marmande" seedlings, each in a wheelie bin with identical growing mixes, except that in 1of the bins I mixed in an amount of Palagonite mineral powder as well.

 

Initial growth was similar and now that they are reasonably large plants I cannot see any significant difference in them. they are both very healthy looking, and the only difference worth noting so far is that the non Palagonite enriched plant is flowering already and has formed small fruit while the other is a week or two behind in this.

 

So growth is no different, flower and fruit formation is a little different but probably not of consequence as all plants may exhibit slight differences this way. Will the fruit taste any different? Will one crop significantly more? Will one be more pest affected?

Will the one that has delayed fruiting end up being a better all round performer?

 Watch this space!!

 

The two bins are at the rear, the ones in front have spuds in. The Palagonite bin is on the right and the other next to it on its left. Both are the same height.

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Comment by Elaine de Saxe on July 21, 2017 at 10:11

I'm interested to know too. My one time of weighing the crop resulted in 800g to 1kg from each plant. Nice but not worth the time and garden space. Scarlett (site originator) reckons you get buckets of spuds in Victoria vs handfuls in Qld.

Comment by Dianne Caswell on July 21, 2017 at 10:05

The outcome should be interesting to see. Just as well you are tall to get up there and pick the fruit etc. Can you please tell me, how much potatoes do you get out of planting in the wheelie bins?

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on July 17, 2017 at 9:53

Good points for the trial, Roger. I prune mine by removing the laterals until they are at a height I can comfortably pick the crop then I allow a new stem to arise from the base. I figure that the fruit is bigger (especially as I mostly grow small-fruited varieties) and there's less greenery to encourage diseases.

Comment by Roger Clark on July 17, 2017 at 7:26

Elaine,

Sometimes I do and sometimes not. With these I have decided not to prune, because (a) I read that pruning reduces the yield, but more importantly (b) I also want these to be treated exactly the same and so if I prune them I might not prune them identically.

My pruning usually is designed to remove growth from the bottom up so as to cut off any growth that may become diseased, which may creep up to the top, and also  to allow the plants to be watered at ground level only so that water doesn't get onto foliage and cause disease/ wilt / etc to creep up the plant. This also allows more air circulation which will cause less problems. Does anyone else prune theirs? and Why? 

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on July 16, 2017 at 17:19

Yes! Very lush! Do you prune your Toms, Roger?

Comment by Roger Clark on July 16, 2017 at 16:02

Hey don't know why the picture wasn't there, hope it is now

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on July 16, 2017 at 15:16

Interesting. Is there a pic, Roger?

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