Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

Views: 39

Add a Comment

You need to be a member of Brisbane Local Food to add comments!

Join Brisbane Local Food

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on October 7, 2017 at 17:49

They're growing well mate!

Comment by Dave Riley on October 7, 2017 at 17:23

Not my favorite vegetables...Both are cluggy.

What's your preferred culinary preparations?

Australian Aborigines use the seeds of purslane to make seedcakes. Greeks, who call it andrakla (αντράκλα) or glystrida (γλυστρίδα), use the leaves and the stems with feta cheese, tomato, onion, garlic, oregano, and olive oil. They add it in salads, boil it, or add it to casseroled chicken. In Turkey, besides being used in salads and in baked pastries, it is cooked as a vegetable similar to spinach, or is mixed with yogurt to form a tsatsiki variant[9]. Similarly, in Egypt, it is known as reglah رجلة and cooked as a vegetable stew. Called Bakleh in Syria and Lebanon, is eaten raw in a famous salad called fattoush, and cooked as a garniture in fatayeh (triangular salted pastries). In Albania, known as burdullak, it also is used as a vegetable similar to spinach, mostly simmered and served in olive oil dressing, or mixed with other ingredients as a filling for dough layers of byrek. In the south of Portugal (Alentejo), baldroegas are used as a soup ingredient. In Pakistan, it is known as qulfa and is cooked as in stews along with lentils, similarly to spinach, or in a mixed green stew.

I can grow the weeds but the bigger leaf form doesn't live long in my soil.

Comment by Darryl Simpson on October 6, 2017 at 13:17

Planter Box made from 2 filing cabinet drawers

Filled with homemade compost and planted with Purslane and Brazilian spinach

Photos

  • Add Photos
  • View All

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Organic Farm Share

Ads by Google

© 2017   Created by Farina Murray.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service