Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

Today's the day … out they came! Twenty-four in and 24 out!

Reading the other posts on this season's Garlic, I reckon I left them in the ground a week or two too long. Joseph I cannot remember them splitting; 'senior moments' reign supreme at times. But you are right, there is an optimum time to pull them. Next year.

The bed is a wicking bed (surprise!) in full sun all day and the second year I've grown Garlic in a wicking bed. Just not the same physical bed. It was under covercrop then mulch from when the Cukes finished to when I planted the cloves on 2nd May. I would have added some home-compost, Mt Sylvia rock dust and a sprinkling of Organic Xtra plus Gypsum.

Some pix then some links to earlier posts on Garlic-growing.

The yellow plastic tags are useful and reuseable:

The crop, more or less in order of size. We bought that trolley second-hand from a nursery closing-down. It is invaluable!

Splitting cloves:

Close-up of the damage … think that getting it out of the ground broke the too-dry skin and uncovered a part of the clove, dammit:

'Dot' n 'dash':

The variety I call Morayfield Magic its origins are from Malta a couple of people-generations ago; it's a soft-neck I surmise since it's collapsing just above the knob. Bought my original knobs from the grower at the Redcliffe waterfront. Some BLFers will have the same Garlic and I'm interested to know how they fared this growing season.

The grower recommends storing with roots and top intact. Store in a cool dry place with some air circulation.

Some links to previous Garlic posts:

Joseph

My small update


Hmm, there are others. I'll add them when I find them.

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Comment by Joseph on September 27, 2015 at 19:30

That's a good crop, Elaine. 100% return! The necks on yours are much thicker compared to the ones I grew. Even my plants with larger bulbs had relatively skinny necks. Yes mine are also soft neck as they started collapsing by around mid-Jul, despite planting the cloves at least 6cm deep. Looking at the tops, you pulled them out sooner than me, but it's strange that some bulbs are still split.

Storing the bulbs is the next challenge. Last year Mum stored hers in a plastic container, that's why so many rotted. I kept mine in a cardboard box. Quite a few dried out. This year I'm hanging them up in mesh bags. The first couple of years we weaved the tops, however the extra effort didn't seem to make much difference as far as storage quality went.

Lissa, we use a lot of garlic. It's been 3 years and we're only just getting to the stage now where we are able to grow enough to use and save for next year. It'd be interesting to see how well their garlic does at Thornlands next year.

Comment by Lissa on September 27, 2015 at 11:23

Plants that take too long to fruit from seed have little use for me.

I'm hoping those few Walking Onions you shared with me proliferate and provide me with that oniony flavour that I like so much in cooking. I can't take the brown onions they give me incredible abdominal pain. Not sure about the whites. Not game to try.

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on September 27, 2015 at 10:35

There's a couple of warmer-weather Onions around, Lockyer Gold being one. Don't know how long Onions take from seed to crop but far longer than the Garlic. The red Onions are more for the cooler conditions. We buy brown Onions usually grown on the Darling Downs but they are a stronger flavour than the red ones.

Comment by Lissa on September 27, 2015 at 6:33

Good work! You and Joseph are really getting the knack with our beloved garlic. I realised the other day I use a (red) onion and some garlic nearly every day in cooking. I need to get in the groove!

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