Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

I want to post about some "Captain Obvious" things that I am surprised that I didn't know.  As a result, this blog will probably be updated regularly.  

1. Calcium

Yep - deficiencies cause blossom end rot in fruit/veg.  Sometimes yellow veins in the leaves.  I know that.  I've always tended to use trace elements to fix it.  

Easier answer is to throw gypsum into the soil when you plant.  It alters the soil composition to break clay and clump the soil to make nutrient uptake easier for the plants.  It is also very high in calcium.  Gypsum works as a preventative, as well as a cure.  Unlike dolomite and lime, it does not alter the ph of the soil.  So, you can plant straight into it. 

Surprised I didn't know that!

2. Manure

Poo ain't poo.  Well, I knew that.  I knew:  horses have one stomach and cows have two.  So, cow manure has less weeds.  

I didn't know that both of those manures are lower in nitrogen which means that while fresh, they won't burn your crops like fowl manure (high in nitrogen) will.  Lots of nitrogen will make the plant grow like crazy, but fruit very little.  However, horse, sheep and cow poo are rich in organic matter, just like compost so they help growth and fruit.  

3. Spring and Autumn

I'm a preserve maker:  jams, chutneys etc.  I always figured I grew and preserved to get through winter.  I think that's not true in Brisbane.  I'm finding with the likes of tomatoes, and most else, that I can grow and preserve in spring and autumn.  Winter is too cold and summer too hot.  Talk about Captain Obvious. 

Feel free to add your own comments!

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Comment by Valerie on April 19, 2020 at 16:27

2 little goats will also happily eat everything else in our yard lol. You'll have manure but nothing will have a chance to grow before it is eaten. 

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on April 19, 2020 at 15:33

LOL.  I'd love a milking goat but not in my tiny yard.  I'm trying to teach Big Bertha the Barred Plymouth Rock to sit on my shoulder like a parrot but she won't be in it.  

Comment by Christa on April 19, 2020 at 13:40

How did we get to pomegranate leaves from Calcium and Manure. Seriously.  It was interesting reading though. 

On the eggshell story, I just read that to grow good tomatoes, you throw a whole egg in the planting hole.

Also avoid applying fresh manure in any area where you’ll be harvesting in the next 120 days, it does contain salmonella and pathogens when fresh.  Fresh chicken manure is hot and high in nitrogen especially when un-composted.  Goat manure is almost odourless in comparison and doesn't attract flies etc.  Just imagine having 2 miniature goats in a pen in the backyard. It would eat all your scraps and excess foods. You could take them for a walk.  Just checking to see if anyone is reading this.

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on April 19, 2020 at 12:38

I saw that too. I'm going to give it a go. 

Comment by Susan on April 19, 2020 at 6:46

Don't think I'm desparate enough to eat pomegranite leaves though :)

Comment by Susan on April 19, 2020 at 6:46

Hey Andy, she just taught me how to make apple cider vinegar.  Not that I'm planning on it at the moment but good to know how simple it is :)

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on April 18, 2020 at 23:26

Well damn.  Morag Gamble told me that pomegranate leaves are entirely edible.  Just throw the older ones into a stew or curry.  My food stores just increased lots. 

Comment by Dianne Caswell on January 27, 2020 at 13:51

I totally agree with you Andy.

I too am a Preserver, I enjoy making Chutneys, Relishes, Sauces as the ones I would want to buy with the same flavours are just too expensive for everyday use. We enjoy our Chutneys etc with our Curries and I use quite a bit of Relish in things like stews, in homemade sausage rolls and both of these on Sandwiches. They are Great with Homemade Cheeses as well.

I make my own Tomato Purees, Sauces etc, and Whole Roma Tomatoes in Tom Sauce, unfortunately I need to buy these when they are cheap at the fruit shop (but if anyone ever has a tonne to spare, I will gladly buy them from you).

I do like to make my own Fruit Syrups & Cordials when I can get enough Produce to do so.

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on January 26, 2020 at 23:20

EPHINY 
I'm a preserve maker:  jams, chutneys etc.  I always figured I grew and preserved to get through winter.  I think that's not true in Brisbane.  I'm finding with the likes of tomatoes, and most else, that I can grow and preserve in spring and autumn.  Winter is too cold and summer too hot.  Talk about Captain Obvious. 

Comment by Jeff Kiehne on September 5, 2018 at 8:26

Calcium chloride and calcium nitrate are also used to add calcium  if you have any used  DampRid Moisture Absorber that is Calcium chloride and could use as may not have excessive contaminates like heavy metals.

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Vetiver grass helps to stabilise soil and protects it against erosion.  It can protect against pests and weeds. Vetiver is also used as animal feed. (Wiki.)

GrowVetiver is a plant nursery run by Dave & Keir Riley that harvests and grows Vetiver grass for local community applications and use. It is based in Beachmere, just north of Brisbane, Australia.


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