Brisbane Local Food

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Dougs Virtual Garden Tour 26/4/20 Part 1

Ok what an effort. This is new to me so it is a little rough, took me ages to figure out how to put the videos back together as my gopro  will only do 5 minutes at 2.7K then splits them up. I have broken the tour into two parts and will upload the second part later and it takes ages. Made a youtube channel last year to put up some videos not realising the time it takes. 

Anyhow this is the first part  

Hope its enjoyable

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Comment by Doug Hanning on May 5, 2020 at 18:44
Christa the guy from cairns is probably Steve Trenerry and you can purchase direct from him. If you send him a message on messanger asking for his latest price list he can then email a paypal order if you give him a list of what you want, its cheaper this way and he has a lot more than what he sells via ebay. I would like to get a king thai mango one day if I could find one.
Comment by Christa on May 5, 2020 at 17:57

Doug, you seem to have success with a lot of fruits from the tropics, that's excellent.  There is a fellow from Cairns who is selling on auction site, and I have bought a couple of plants from him today.  I tend to lean to sub-tropical fruit trees, though I am running out of room.  Considering getting a Mulgova or Mulgoa mango, but the fact that it is a big tree scares me a bit, (bonsai?)  We have a King Thai,  Royal Red, Dwarf Irwin  and what I thought was a calypso ended up being an R2E2 and also a KP. 

Comment by Rob Walter on May 5, 2020 at 9:35

Christa, what procedure do you use for air layering pawpaws? I gave it a fairly half-arsed go this autumn but now I wish I'd done it properly.

Comment by Doug Hanning on May 4, 2020 at 17:21

Hey Christa the papaya was a southern red from daleys and I dont know much about air layering. The other little tree i an araza boi think its eugenia stipitatia or something like that. A really sour juicy fruit but I love them.

Comment by Christa on May 4, 2020 at 16:48

Doug, your papaya on Video one, down from Large leaf papaya, I think it is a Big Red, do they set seed? Do you know where I can buy a plant.  I think it is the same one I had some years ago and it grew quite big but fell over after a storm. Some of the reds don't set seed. Have you tried air layering that red one.

The round leaf does not give as many fruit as the others. We have some sunrise solo and sth american red but an old tall red we got a few years back is still producing, we need a ladder to harvest, better half does not have luck with ladders.  

Had another look at your video and you name a plant sounds something like arisa, a small plant, what is that. Did you mean carissa the natal plum?

Comment by Rob Walter on April 29, 2020 at 14:19

The achacha is pretty easy from seed, although they're probably not in the shops any more. I put mine straight in the ground because they are supposed to have a long taproot and although the top metre of my soil is appalling, I tell myself that after that it might get really good.

Comment by CHERYL SLAPP on April 28, 2020 at 19:32

Amazing collection of fruit trees, I have no idea what some of the are and so disappointed that the actual visit had to be cancelled.  Hopefully when this iso is over I can see it in person.  Very impressed with your videos skills, great way for us to see your fruit forest. I would love an achacha, love the taste so will have to see if Steve from Oz rare fruits has any. 

Comment by Rob Walter on April 27, 2020 at 19:00
This is incredible. There are so many things there is like to taste. I'm in a rental, so things have to be pretty good to be worth planting. The achacha is a bit discouraging. Mine is smaller than yours but I was hoping for flowers this spring. Maybe not.
Comment by Doug Hanning on April 27, 2020 at 17:26

Thanks all, would have been nicer to have you all around but better than nothing.

Dave I have a large possum eater

The rest of the trees get netted for flying foxes and king parrots. The chooks and ducks pretty much eat anything with ff.

Roger it helps to have heaps of mulch. All my prunings are mulched as well. I do use town water and during dry spells we use about 20% more than our local average, I dont mind paying for it and I am frugal with showers etc much to Rachels disgust, and yes have pulled out about 20 trees that I didnt like.

Dianne hopefully it wont be long before we can do a proper garden visit. I still have a tulsi basil I can drop round at your front gate if you want.

Comment by Dianne Caswell on April 27, 2020 at 15:17

I can't say anymore than everyone else has said, they have said it all. You did a wonderful job of videoing the Virtual Garden Visit and I can't wait to be able to visit in person. My mouth is salivating thinking of all your wonderful fruits on those trees. You have certainly created a Paradise. Thank You so Much for Sharing.

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