Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

How to tell them apart courtesy of the NSW Dept of Environment, the photography is by John Pumpars, a Qlder I had the privilege of meeting when a member of Restoring Australian Native Amphibia (RANA). John now lives in northern NSW and publishes his photos under the name of Frog Prints. There are 3 .png making up the pamphlet originally as a .pdf which I wasn't able to upload. This is the pamphlet in 3 parts ...

 

 

 

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Comment by Elaine de Saxe on January 24, 2012 at 21:39

Thanks to updates from two members, two more frog links.

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on February 23, 2011 at 10:59

The Cane Toad spawn is totally different to our native frog and toad spawn. Not all is like the Striped Marsh Frog spawn though. Some is so hard to see being clear jelly, often attached to rock or plant, the 'bubble bath' spawn is so easy to see, wish it were all like that! Regretfully the CT taddies will eat any native taddies but then tadpoles if short of food will eat each other anyway.

 

All parts of the life cycle of the Cane Toad are toxic.

 

When removing CT spawn, use sticks and gloves if you can, and put it into the rubbish although if you can compost CTs and they don't poison the plants, then perhaps composting the spawn might be OK too.

Comment by Scarlett on February 23, 2011 at 9:58

apparently the native tadpoles often have colours (e.g. blue), whereas the cane toad taddies are just plain black.

also, of course, cane toad spawn is laid in long strings (kind of like frothy seaweed), whereas native frog spawn is in loose bubbly clumps like bubble bath

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