Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

2014 SPRING - SEPTEMBER TO NOVEMBER

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Comment by Lissa on October 24, 2014 at 4:46

I've seen them growing in regular pots (Mum grew them for decorative) but they don't seem to thrive and produce large edible bulbs like they do in the wet spots.

Comment by Florence on October 23, 2014 at 13:19

Neither of my taro plants were growing in wet spots... one of them even got smoothered by the galangal, and it looks like it's still struggling to grow (so not dead yet) after I cut back most of the galangal last weekend.  I'll dig them up soon to check whether I've got anything worth cooking under the ground...

Comment by Lissa on October 23, 2014 at 5:06

Message me your address Janet and I'll come pick them up if you aren't able to attend the GV's :) Appreciate that, thank you.

Comment by Janet Fong on October 22, 2014 at 12:04

Sure Lissa. I haven't been able to go to the GVs but I'll put a couple in pots for you and see if I can attend the Nov or Dec GV.

Comment by Lissa on October 22, 2014 at 6:19

My understanding is the basic need for Taro growth is a wet spot. So your nasty neglected wet spot was their ideal heaven by the sounds. I don't have any wet spots. Quite the opposite in fact which is why rosemary and lavender grow so well here.

If we get together at a GV Janet I would like some tubers to give it another go - maybe your variety are more palatable, but I won't pursue these myself.

Comment by Janet Fong on October 21, 2014 at 10:06

I really don't know anything about growing yam, taro and cocoyam. Bun Long (BL) taro is popular in Chinese cooking so I bought a handful of taro tubers from a Vietnamese grocery shop in Inala and planted them in the strip where nothing else would grow except weeds. The area (5mx1m) is constantly moist to wet and half shade. After 3 years of neglect, BL Taros began to overtake the weeds . Now I occasionally chuck in some fertiliser pellets and potting mix. I still don't know much about growing taros but I seem to have an endless supply of the tubers.

BL Taros are available from Green Harvest, or you can send me an email and get them from me.

How to tell if BL Taro? Description of Bun Long Taro from Green Harvest: The leaves are green with a purplish centre spot, the stems become reddish as they mature.

Comment by Lissa on October 21, 2014 at 4:41

I liked Cocoyam when I tried it cooked. My plant isn't thriving though. Does it need wet feet like Taro?

Comment by Lissa on October 20, 2014 at 17:56

Thank you girls. Florence, I will have to figure out how to add a link to your blog from mine :) Gayle did show me....

Bun Long Taro - where do I get that one from Janet? The one I have doesn't have a name and isn't growing all that well. I tried growing one in the water garden but it never shot so I suspect it's dead.

Comment by Janet Fong on October 20, 2014 at 16:38

To cook taro, I shallow fry the taro pieces in oil until golden brown and then drain the oil, then stew until soft. Taro does not absorb oil so you can pour out almost the same amount of oil as you put in. I usually then do a stew with chicken or pork with a sauce.

Bun Long taro softens easily and has a nice flavour.

Comment by Florence on October 20, 2014 at 9:46

I think the challenge in the new veg is not so much growing them, but how to eat them!! Many of them them grow without much effort ~ I haven't tried cooking (yet to harvest) my taro yet, but I liked them when I eat them at resturants ~

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