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I can't believe how many squash this one plant is producing, it gets a picking every 3 to 4 days, and still more come.

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Comment by Rob Collings on January 29, 2016 at 13:14

Barbara, I've had 2 squash go to maturity (below, with rain gauge behind). I've picked the smaller of the 2, and will open this and check the state of the seeds. They feel very hard/solid on the outside.

Comment by Christa on November 17, 2015 at 12:03

Maybe there is more to it than I thought, Rob.   It is good to hear how other gardeners are trying different things to improve their soils, and I am hoping that the soil in this yard, which has been looked after by one nurturing gardener before me for about 50 years, will do the job.   I like your words "leap of faith" and thanks for your offer of a cup of soil. As they say- bring forth and multiply.

Comment by Rob Collings on November 17, 2015 at 10:34

Barbara, it's nice to have a good local place like it, I love the big Jade Perch they have in their aquaponics.

Comment by Rob Collings on November 17, 2015 at 10:30

Hi Christa, it looks like I channeled your questions while I was writing the previous response. The biggest shrug of shoulders I have with this one is the requirement to have a microbiologist and lab available in order to know for sure that the microbes are living (shortly or a long time after application) ... it had to turn into a leap of faith that they're (or at least some of them) are there, for me.

EM Bucket sharing sounds like a good idea, and I'll bring a 'leap of faith' bucket along to the next GV.

A theory I have for an advantage of the full inoculation would be, that the full spectrum of spores are available for wider range of possible living conditions on initial application from the direct product. I might have more GW before the next GV and if this is the case, I will bring a few samples from the main jar along for Elaine and yourself.

I do wonder if some of these EM produce visible fruiting bodies (like/or mushrooms & toadstools) and maybe a more simple spore print or similar test could prove at least existence of some EM to the home gardener.

Comment by Barbara Tealby on November 17, 2015 at 10:29

Aqua Gardening looks like an interesting place to visit. It's local to me so I think I''ll make a trip down there.

Comment by Rob Collings on November 17, 2015 at 10:06

Hi Barbara, I'm curious what a mature squash looks like, so I'll let one go and find out.

Comment by Rob Collings on November 17, 2015 at 10:02

Hi Elaine, I should have said EM because there seem to be 2 fungi that can be abbreviated to it ...

Endomycorrhiza & Ectomycorrhiza, (I'm no expert, I'm still and always reading about all this stuff).  

The inoculation I have used to date is Great White which I bought at Aqua Gardening. A little bit goes a long way. I'm hoping that the broad range of microbes available in this, will cover for a wide range of environments (including the wetter ones like wetter roots of plants in lower areas of the wicking beds).

I think the instructions invite re-application on same plant/growing platform regularly which is something I have not done to date, and will avoid doing (I'm using the motto, if the little guys die out under normal circumstances they should not be there).

Here's a listing of the EM, Bacteria and other in Great White ... 

Endomycorrhiza
Glomus aggregatum – 83 props per gram
Glomus intraradices – 83 props per gram
Glomus mosseae – 83 props per gram
Glomus etunicatum – 83 props per gram
Glomus clarum – 11 props per gram
Glomus monosporum – 11 props per gram
Paraglomus brazilianum – 11 props per gram
Glomus deserticola – 11 props per gram
Gigaspora margarita – 11 props per gram

Ectomycorrhiza
Pisolithus tinctorious – 187,875 propagules per gram
Rhizopogon luteolus – 5,219 props per gram
Rhizopogon fulvigleba – 5,219 props per gram
Rhizopogon villosullus – 5,219 props per gram
Rhizopogon amylopogon – 5,219 props per gram
Scleroderma citrinum – 5,219 props per gram
Scleroderma cepa – 5,219 props per gram

Bacteria
Azotobacter chroococcum – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus subtilis – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus licheniformis – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus azotoformans – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus megaterium – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus coagulans – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus pumilus – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus thuringiensis – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Bacillus amyloliquefaciens – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Paenibacillus durum – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Paenibacillus polymyxa – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Saccharomyces cerevisiae – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Pseudomonas aureofaciens – 525,000 CFU’s per gram
Pseudomonas fluorescens – 525,000 CFU’s per gram

Trichoderma koningii-187,875 CFU’s per gram
Trichoderma harzianum-125,250 CFU’s per gram

Other Ingredients
Glycine
Vitamin package

Comment by Christa on November 17, 2015 at 9:53

After reading the info on Ecto and Endo, I am confused, is it a new thing in gardening.  I read about Myco and thought about it but I thought it a bit expensive, and thought, oh no, is this another thing I have to buy,  Is this a once only product and does it remain living in the soil, or is it a food for the fungi in the soil.  Does it stay in the soil and grow or does it need replacing regularly.   If this is the case, we could share a bucket of soil between us BLFers and spread it around.  Questions, questions, questions.

Comment by Barbara Tealby on November 17, 2015 at 8:27

Will you let it set some seed later on, do you think? Or are the little squash just too good? Will be interested to see if the melons do just as well in the same area. What I like is that the plant is putting its energy into fruit instead of just producing big leaves - is this because of the microbes?

Comment by Elaine de Saxe on November 17, 2015 at 8:07

What is this ecto-whatsis stuff you use, Rob? I now there's lots of microbes around now. I'd settle for something used and loved by a practical gardener here. Lissa - I never was able to find that website to buy the stuff you use and now I have forgotten its name.

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