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I am posting this to prove I got some too. I managed to get 4 out of 8 to edible size. I reckon they are way too much work. Compared to Silverbeet, cabbage is slow and pest prone.

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Comment by Andrew Cumberland on October 11, 2020 at 18:58

Might have to give them a  try.  

Comment by Doug Hanning on October 11, 2020 at 18:34

The collards taste like the cabbage leaves if you pick them early. Like the ones on the outside of a cabbage, pretty good.

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on October 11, 2020 at 15:44

How do they taste? I haven't eaten them. 

Comment by Doug Hanning on October 11, 2020 at 7:04

Yeah Jeff i have a heap of collards, much better if out exposed to insects. Cabbages griwn in green house.

Comment by Jeff Kiehne on October 11, 2020 at 6:32

Collard Greens anyone growing  as would seem to be easier then cabbage .

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on October 10, 2020 at 23:43

Really? I love silverbeet.  In my first season, it was bitter but that was because my soil was nitrogen deficient.  These days of abundant compost, the silverbeet is lovely. I tend to cook it though - just like I do with cabbage. We are big fans of the spanakopita here.  A bit of research has turned up all sorts of krauts, including spinach even.  I'll probably do a wombok and silverbeet mix in the style of kimchi which I really enjoy.  

Comment by Dave Riley on October 10, 2020 at 22:33

There are recipes for such a creature. But I'd seriously hesitate.

Koreans have been around for a long time and they are not known to make kimchi from beets or greens.

Then, almost anything is fermentable.

Not that it is my way, but silver beet is eminently dry-able either with sunshine or electricity. Albeit only vaguely better tasting than ...(gulp)...kale.

I've harvested Kale and Silverbeet recently and seek only to give it away.

What was I thinking when I planted them! 

I tried. I'll eat anything. But...why put yourself through it?

And still there's more -- outback. Waiting. Eat me.Waste not. Fortunately I still have friends who see my leafy offerings as the epitome of generosity and kindness.

More fool them. I'm exploiting  them as garbage gutsers.

The Greeks are Silverbeet eaters. Dolmades wraps... and more.

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on October 10, 2020 at 21:03

LOL.  In my case it will be an abundance of silverbeet.  I wonder if you can make kimchi/sauerkraut from silverbeet leaves?

Comment by Dave Riley on October 10, 2020 at 8:42

Sloth has consequence:

Comment by Andrew Cumberland on October 9, 2020 at 19:51

Too much like work for me. 

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Vetiver grass helps to stabilise soil and protects it against erosion.  It can protect against pests and weeds. Vetiver is also used as animal feed. (Wiki.)

GrowVetiver is a plant nursery run by Dave & Keir Riley that harvests and grows Vetiver grass for local community applications and use. It is based in Beachmere, just north of Brisbane, Australia.


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