Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

I use my sickle for Vetiver harvesting.

As one does.

TRAMONTINAO. Brazilian.

I have three.

So there I was mucking about in the beds sickling hither and yon...

[As one does]

...when I turned the blade vertically and dragged it through the dirt slicing through the weeds.

I am of the soil microbial persuasion and as such I respect the demographics of plant roots. Even if they are weeds.

Do not disturb the underground more than is absolutely necessary.

My sickle however, sliced through the terrestrials like a knife through butter and detached  weeds from their anchorage while fluffing up the mulch.

Easy peasy.

You can PULL WEEDS OUT of course -- thereby detaching their goodness while exporting their harm. But a sickle slices and dices, chip chopping the weedy matter into mulch.

Great on running weeds.

There are, of course many slicing tools for weeds. Hoes with sharp edges for instance. But if you have a mulched garden they are difficult to operate because of the soil covering. They are far too disturbing and breaking through the mulch layer with a  hoe  can so often be cumbersome

With my stabbing sickle, I can get up close to any plant and slice away at the weeds that surround it. Stab and pull through towards your torso in a straight line. You won't need to plunge deeply -- just a scrape. 

So it is very effective between radishes and spring onions where broader tools or weed pulling would only uproot the plants.

There is  similar tool -- the Japanese Weeding Sickle -- which is surely very effective. But like my Ho-Mi Little Hoe-- is, I think, too broad for easy working in a mulched bed. It also turns over too much of the soil rather than the mulch. It is dirt hungry.

Another advantage with my sickle is that with its serrated sharp edge, it sliced through the most fibrous of mulches. It grabs on and cuts through.

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I should add that in my patch I use mulch to damper any weeds but -- as you know -- the dry weather is not conducive to collecting mulch to deposit on top of the beds.

My backup supply is lawn cuttings...but there has not been much of a harvest on offer from my guys.

So the weeds cash in on the fact that I moisten the earth. Since I use a sprinkler the opportunity for weed growth increases.

I collect palm fronds  and cut up with a power saw and secateurs there is a lot of fibrous material have been putting some under a lime tree for years  and use soft parts  around sweet corn  but does disappear  saw a bin put out full of palm fronds so full they could not close  what a waste.If have the hard parts just have to wait long enough  for the fibers to degrade and separate the palm fronds have no strength long ways just like banana trees.  

I love those type tools often used by Asian people. They are more inclined to use manual tools instead of motorised ones. A few years back, Bogi fair had a blacksmith making those tools from car flat spring pieces.  It was the best tool I have had in years, I use it for digging planting holes, scraping weeds and making furrows for water. It has a longer handle and is a bit heavier.

This surprised me.Here is Su Dennett (well known permie)using a sickle like I do.Of course I'm down low with a short handle. (Image taken from HERE.)

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GrowVetiver

Vetiver grass helps to stabilise soil and protects it against erosion.  It can protect against pests and weeds. Vetiver is also used as animal feed. (Wiki.)

GrowVetiver is a plant nursery run by Dave & Keir Riley that harvests and grows Vetiver grass for local community applications and use. It is based in Beachmere, just north of Brisbane, Australia.


Place your business add here! ($5 per month or $25 for 9 months)

Talk to Andy on 0422 022 961.  You can  Pay on this link

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