Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

I'd like to plant a good RANGE of different potatoes rather than just one or two varieties. Instead of  purchasing in bulk of any one type I'd like a mix of seed stock -- esp with heritage in mind...

Any suggestions as to source?

GreenHarvest offers bulk buys of each type when I'm after a mix.

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That's interesting (about the spray) Cres. Same stuff they spray garlic with perhaps?

The spuds I buy all chit quite quickly so I'm guessing they haven't been sprayed which is curious but to my benefit. These are all I have planted this season. No bought seed potatoes. And they are growing very well.

I haven't heard of regular potatoes being grown on a tower, only sweet potatoes, so that is also interesting. Didn't know spuds could come in determinate and indeterminate. I've only heard that term used for toms.

Let us know how you go with your hunt and project won't you.

From what I've gathered l don't think it's officially/botanically known as determinate/indeterminate. I think growers around the world may have taken on the tomato terms due to a lack of naming convention for potatoes with that characteristic.

I'm still not 100% convinced that they do push out tubers above a certain point. From the numerous youtube potato tower harvests I've seen I think the larger harvests are because some varieties grow for longer and taller, therefore taking advantage of more nutrient being constantly added with longer grow time to push energy to their roots.

You'll see a lot of forum posts of people who have tried growing potatoes in towers and even though the plant grows all the way up, come harvest time there's only spuds at the base of the plant near the roots. Conversely others use the same method and have high yields with spuds growing a lot further up the haulm (stem).

I'm still sifting through the info and working it all out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dx5r1Fsm6VQ

Ahh I'm more familiar with this method being called mounding. I haven't had a lot of success with it myself but then I've been spasmodic with my efforts too.

Hope you get some results from your research. 

A sweet potato tower is a different beast, grown on a frame.

From what Scarlett Patrick said, Potatoes produce more tubers in cooler conditions. Scarlett is the originator of this site and a trained horticulturalist from Victoria who spent several years up here and has returned to Victoria. She contrasted the crops she grew in Vic to what was grown here and came to the 'need cooler conditions' conclusion.

Recalling that Potatoes originated from the high Andes, the conditions we have here are on the very limit of their comfort.

Cres - went looking for info about growing spuds this morning and found this American article about determinate and indeterminate spuds. Some varieties are definitely more likely to succeed with the mounding method.

Check out this REPORT on growing spuds locally (in Brisbane) from a workshop provided by Lyle from Green P, might be of some help. Lyle would be the guy to talk to about best local varieties for Brisbane. 

Here's another VIDEO talking about det and indet spuds. The varieties may not be available in Australia.

Thanks for that. The overseas lists always reinforce how meagre the info is on the few varieties that are available here in Au.

Coles  had Australian Peruvian potatoes this week for $4.5 KG  what ever they are.

I went looking for these on the net Jeff with no success. A contradiction. I might be going shopping at Coles tomorrow after work so will look out for them.

I got 3 exotically named varieties of potatoes from Coles today. But I've forgotten what they were called. One had purple flesh and was elongated like a fat Kipfler. .One was similar to Pink Eye  (but I don't think they called it that).

Roasted all for tea and they were tasty.

Jeff - when I arrived at Coles they had a sign up apologising for no Aust Peruvian potatoes due to weather conditions.

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