Brisbane Local Food

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I've created a small water feature from a largish tub left over from the drought time - this is mainly for the bees as a water source, with a Lebanese Cress and Kangkong put into it in their pots.

For all those with experience with such things, is this big enough to add some native fish (Pacific Blue eyes have been suggested) to keep the mosquito larvae down?

It's in a relatively shady spot with some sun during the AM.

If "yes" to the fish...where's the best place to get my hands on some? and how many should I add? and do I need to feed the poor wee things once they're in?

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Try throwing in some bread and the gambusia should appear in no time. They can be easily scooped but you do have to be fast with the net. There are plenty of comfortable spots at Lake Samsonvale. And I find dressing in a ninja suit will greatly assist in increasing speed and hand eye coordination.

PS. If you do go fishing in a ninja suit, please take selfies and post. Thanks! :)

There are not enough selfies on BrisbaneLocalFood. Come on people, it's 2013! And my friend who's had the fish for years never, ever feeds them anything, they just eat whatever falls in and what lives in there.

Got all dress up in my wierd beekeeping outfit to oblige, and the batteries on my camera are flat. The cosmos is trying to tell me not to do it ;)

So you have the entire kit now? Never mind, flat batteries can be recharged *hint hint*

Struth, now I wish I owned a ninja suit. Why oh why didn't I buy one when I had the chance :/ I could wear my beekeeping outfit. It looks pretty strange.

I'm thinking I will take a couple of offspring and a small child as cover when I do it, so I look like I'm doing some kind of child-education activity.

Haha - I would love to see that selfie!

Go with Gambusia. Gambusia are also known as mosquitofish. That's not because they form lasting friendly relationships with mosquitos, but because they eat them. That's what they were introduced for, initially, to control mosquitos. They will be in plague proportions in your local creek. I would get a handful and see how they go. They are enthusiastic breeders (giving birth to live young).

The only real drawbacks are that they are reputed to eat frogs eggs, and they are illegal. If the DPI inspectors were to come to your house for some completely unimaginable reason, you would just say "I got them from the creek. I thought they were OK!" and I'm sure that would be fine. If they do eat your frogs eggs, just clean them out and put something else in, having proved that the concept works.

I have a neighbour who claims to have blue eyes in a pond of his, but they don't match Elaine's description at all, as it's still water and of not much more volume than your picture. He's had them for years and he got them from a neighbour who had them for years before that. I've never bothered to pull one out and identify it, but maybe I'll do that this weekend and let you know what they are.

White Clouds are quite similar in size, shape and colouring to Blue Eyes except that White Clouds have red tails and Blue Eyes have yellow tails. And White Clouds swim in a jerky almost 90-degree motion - weird to watch darting and turning as though they were swimming around an invisible block.

White Clouds are a great, hardy little fish - and cheap. I still recommend my 10 for $3 Gudgeon.  Damn hardy, great larvae eaters and cheap as. 

Where exactly (shop address) did you buy yours from Andy?

That would be good Rob, thank you. I'm willing to try anything - it is just to keep the mosquitos down after all - they're not pets. I had some goldfish in a similar set up around the other side of the house and they died so don't want to do that again. Just something small and hardy that will do the job without any fuss.

Hey Lissa

I'm still planning a trip to Lake Samsonvale to get some redclaw and M. australiense. Now that the weather's warmed nicely (too nicely some might say), the redclaw should be out and about looking for food. If you like, you can come along then and scoop some gambusia. A freshwaster fishing licence is not needed for gathering bait and crustaceans.

Alternatively, there's a big pond on this estate where I've seen loads of gambusia. The problem is that the whole area is covered by reeds and tall grass, which makes it a perfect habitat for those unpleasant legless reptiles. In fact, I've seen two large and very squashed brown snakes on the road by the pond.

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