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I was asked the other day if I thought that the Queen Garnet Plum was the result of cross breeding the european plum with a Davidson's Plum. I answered, I don't believe so, due to the plants differing above the Order classification ... but I'm no biologist or botanist, so I really can't be sure what can be crossed these days (with no GE involvement).

The question did make me wonder whether the Davidson's contained any levels of 

anthocyanins, the antioxidant flavornoids that created all the buzz about the Queen Garnet. 

And the answer is yes, d. jerseyana contains almost 3 times the level of anthocyanins than a blueberry (RIRDC document in link below)

The Garnet Plum is reported to contain 3 to 6 times the level of anthocyanins than a blueberry. (nutrifruit document in link below)

I must point out that GP reference are Full Weight analysis and the DP references in the table below is a Dry Weight analysis, however the blueberry is a control in the below table, which is where I gained the 'almost 3 times' reference from.

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The table below shows anthocyanins levels (column 4) for many Australian Natives including 2 types of Davidson's Plum

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Sample

Dry matter content

Total phenolic content (mg GA Eq/g DW)

Total anthocyanins (mg C 3G Eq/g DW)

Total Reducing Capacity (FRAP) (μmol Fe+2/g DW)

ORAC-H (μmol TEq/gDW)

ORAC-L (μmol TEq/gDW)

ORAC-T (μmol TEq/gDW)

Spice

Tasmannia Pepper B.

100

16.86 ± 0.7

79.2 ± 4.1

332. 9 ± 19. 9

779.49 ± 82.60

176.87 ± 2.72

956.36

Tasmannia Pepper L.

100

102.06 ± 1.23

1.24 ± 0.02

1314.5 ± 67.9

3504.42 ± 392.5

572.70 ± 27.66

4077.12

Anise Myrtle

100

55.93 ± 4.67

ND

2158.0 ± 88.5

2446.06 ± 242.1

119.70 ± 0.15

2565.76

Lemon Myrtle

100

31.44 ± 5.9

ND

1225.3 ± 72.2

1889.82 ± 206.6

1470.05 ± 171.96

3359.87

Bush Tomato

100

12.40 ± 0.9

ND

206.2 ± 9.0

912.77 ± 117.69

18.56 ± 2.20

931.33

Wattleseed

100

0.76 ± 0.12

ND

17.8 ± 1.2

53.40 ± 7.93

8.14 ± 0.45

61.54

Fruit

Australian Desert Lime

19.6

9.36 ± 0.35

ND

177.8 ± 11.7

197.17 ± 22.56

52.28 ± 0.73

249.45

Kakadu Plum

12.2

158.57 ± 12.29

ND

4032.5 ± 282.9

1841.97 ± 196.85

669.50 ± 81.15

2511.47

Lemon Aspen

15.5

10.49 ± 0.34

ND

90.2 ± 15.3

848.70 ± 73.70

343.95 ± 0

1192.65

Davidsonia pruriens

7.1

48.60 ± 2.48

47.80 ± 1.2

670.7 ± 49.3

982.41 ± 129.30

210.38 ± 2.06

1192.79

Davidsonia jerseyana

5.3

50.25 ± 6.34

98.65 ± 6.5

599.8 ± 20.7

686.24 ± 109.83

214.04 ± 0.64

900.28

Quandong (dry)

90.1

32.87 ± 2.89

0.53 ± 0.1

454.9 ± 16.8

1987.99 ± 221.50

39.98 ± 1.00

2027.97

Riberry

8.8

23.62 ± 1.27

35.34 ± 2.5

376.9 ± 21.3

565.91 ± 72.39

251.31 ± 9.73

817.22

Blueberry (control)

15.0

35.4

38.93 ± 0.99

397.1 ± 20.0

434.6*

2.4*

436.8*

 

[*Source: Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of selected foods – 2007. Retrieved on March 19, 2009 from http://www.ars.usda.gov. Values recalculated for DW based on DW=15%FW.]; ND – not determined 

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Non-Australian foods including Elder Berries, Choke Berries and Black currents match the high Anthocyanin levels that the Queen Garnet has to offer (USDA Database for flavonoid content of selected foods)

References :

Queen Garnet Plum 

Nutrafruit

Australian Native Foods

Health Benefits of Australian Native Foods (contains above table)

Links

Davidson's Plum

With all the measurement formats being different, I would love to see the QGP and the DP results within the same measurement results table.

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Replies to This Discussion

Thanks for letting us in on that observation. That is indeed noteworthy.  If it is not a result of the flu or other ailment, then it looks like the DP or wasabi is a very healthy food.  Looking forward to your followup and progress.  The wasabi may also be speeding up your metabolism.  

Well Rob, I am looking after my 2 trees and they are slowly growing, one in a wicking drum and the other in the ground.  Still looking for a smooth leaf type. I have space for one more in the ground, as I like the height and look of the trees.   It's great to hear from you.

Hi all, hope you are well, here are some exciting new findings relating to this subject, released in May 2019.

Davidsonia pruriens reduces symptoms in rats with diet-induced meta...

Here's a pdf readable & downloadable link - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/332216177_The_edible_nativ...'s_plum_Davidsonia_pruriens_reduces_symptoms_in_rats_with_diet-induced_metabolic_syndrome

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