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Here's to hoping that the revised outlook in ten days has less of the 'Above average temperatures' and 'Below average rainfall' in it.

BOM - Climate outlooks

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Just what we needed :-\. Thank goodness for wicking beds and for the inground plants, terracotta waterers.

We had been thinking of purchasing another water tank, but things look a bit grim for rain. Maybe we will invest in more sugar cane mulch. 

My tanks were put in right in the middle of the drought. The installer reckoned they'd not get filled. Surprising how little rain it takes given a big enough roof area, to fill first the 1000L then the 5000L tanks. Even the overnight dew drips into the tanks and helps keep them filled.

We just have to find a space that is suitable.  A bladder under the house would be ideal but they are so expensive.  Maybe a slimline tank will be better than another big one.  Wicking beds and pots are the best thing we have done in our backyard thanks to you.  

Woo hoo - it's thanks to Elaine Ross for finding info on wicking beds in the first place :-)

This hot dry weather I need to water at least once a week sometimes more often. With only 6000L of water unless I used town water and at times that can be restricted, food gardening in the ground here would be impossible.

Yep your right about that Elaine,Thrifty me set up  12 OFF 205 litre drums all connected in line and it only takes some half decent rain to fill them.If you think about it 1MM of rain over 1sq metre will produce 1 litre and on a large roof area you can see that for yourself how it wouldnt 

take much.Unfortunately water is one thing if only we could conquer the dreadful heat burning everything up,Oh well thats gardening.

The heat is not so much 'gardening' as 'political inaction'. Polite words fail me, fill in the blanks ;-)

Thanks for sharing that video Rob. More impact than just reading statistics.

I'm liking Karla's wicking beds here.

Have you looked at getting a intermediate bulk container 1000 liters they are the cheapest  or 200 liter blue drums the IBC  could be put on a raised stand and plant underneath .

Jeff, we are using the 200L blue drums (the colour is a bit off putting) but when the drums are cut in half and a hole put in at 300mm from the top, they are just right for circular wicking beds and they can be raised if you wish. (make sure they have the lid on the top when you buy them).  We have seen the large 1000L square bins, but can they be successfully cut in half and use one as 2 bins.  The 200L rectangular black bins from the plastic people are good for small trees but they are expensive but long lasting.   We have also adapted some large black plastic pots from bunnies, with putting black plastic in the bottom and sealing the drainage holes a bit and then  cut down the sides of the plastic to about  250 to 300 mm from the top, this works as well and is an inexpensive way of doing it but not long lasting.

Also a proper THANK YOU goes to Elaine Ross for introducing me to wicking containers, and also reminding me how lovely bromeliads can be in gardening. They fit nicely in all the little nooks and crannies and are not much work in gardening. 

If you've the right tools the IBCs can be cut in half. Big snag with them is they are light-coloured and need to be blocked out first with black plastic then with heavy shade-cloth to keep the root-run more cool than without any insulation.

There are lots of containers around which with a bit of ingenuity can be turned into tanks or wicking bins. The black plastic pots made for plants are probably long-lasting - maybe 5-10 years - I really don't know. Fibreglass baths are good, mine is a frog pond but it could easily have been a garden bed had I known about wicking bins at the time. Still the frogs love it. Suspect they need to be in the shade though - as a frog pond it is in the shade but not a suitable spot for vegetables.

Elaine, found these on auction site for about $300, but they seem to be 2/3 of a full bin not half.  Not very pretty but practical I suppose.  

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