Brisbane Local Food

Growing local

Maybe there’s a simple explanation - I hope so.

Now the conventional wisdom as I understand it is that you place plants in groups with similar water/fertiliser/pH/light needs.

This makes sense to me but then I am not trained in either Horticulture, Chemistry or Permaculture. Two wonderful years of studying Botany and 50 years of sporadic food gardening are my only claims to ‘fame’.

Recently I ventured into hydroponics. I bought a ‘naked’ kit from a guy at Childers. Grew some lettuces and tried one or two other crops. Eventually sold the kit. So: in the blurb which came with the kit, the author suggested that the (for example) Lettuces would take only the nutrients they needed. The excesses nutrients could be tipped on other plants when nutrient-change time came.

If it is so that plants only take what they need, how does it happen that (for example) a nitrogen-rich fertiliser is applied to a fruiting plant, that plant will grow lots of leaves and produce few fruit? If the explanation of the hydroponic nutrients is correct, then why doesn’t the fruiting plant just ignore the excess nitrogen?

And since I do not know anything useful about Permaculute - what are the ‘guilds’ I have seen mentioned? Is that plants whose needs are similar or a diverse mix of plants which can account for all the available nutrients?

Views: 72

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Definitely the latter, a diverse mix of plants which can account for all the available nutrients, but with a twist, the plants themselves should provide each other with the required nutrients.

Can't have a city with just bakers as you'll run out of flour rather soon.

http://neverendingfood.org/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/Permaculture-...

Excellent, thank you Jake :-)

RSS

Important note about adding photos:

Always add photos using the "From my computer" option, even if you are on a mobile phone or other device.

Photos

  • Add Photos
  • View All

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

VETIVER COMMUNITY PROJECT

Vetiver grass helps to stabilise soil and protects it against erosion.  It can protect against pests and weeds. Vetiver is also used as animal feed. (Wiki.)

The Vetiver Community Project is a plant nursery run by Dave & Keir Riley that harvests and grows Vetiver grass for local community applications and use. It is based in Beachmere, just north of Brisbane, Australia.


Place your business add here! ($5 per month or $25 for 9 months)

Talk to Andy on 0422 022 961.  You can  Pay on this link

© 2020   Created by Andrew Cumberland.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service